Link 26 Feb Frantic Gallery | Atsushi Koyama»
Link 26 Feb The Art of Macoto Murayama»
Photo 19 Jan 1 note Cousteau Tazuke, “La Gioconda # 1”, acrylic resin, acrylic paint, alkyd paint, 60x40cm, 2014 

Cousteau Tazuke, “La Gioconda # 1”, acrylic resin, acrylic paint, alkyd paint, 60x40cm, 2014 

Link 13 Nov Macoto Murayama, Botech composition 1, 5'13min, 2013»
Photo 7 Nov 1 note Macoto Murayama, Botech Composition - 1 - b, digital c-print, 150x100cm, 2013, Ed.5
 
Frantic Gallery proudly presents the new series of works by Macoto Murayama titled “Botech Compositions” in which the artist brings together in one digital image different types of flowers structuring it in a labyrinth type of visuality with carpet-like expansion. 
 
As in previous works summarized by the titled “Botech Art” everything starts with the real flower. Macoto finds the suitable plant, dissects it by cutting the petal and ovary with scalpel and observes it with magnifying glasses and microscope. He makes sketches and photographs its parts modeling its form and structure using 3ds Max, a softwear for architecture and 3D animation. He renders digitalized elements of the organic form and creates a composition, generating symbiotic image that eventually unites the Botanic and the Technical, Organic and Artificial, Nature and Digit. The “Botech” synthesis, in spite of its oxymoronic nature, stays true to both Science and Nature leading the viewer along the borderline of Mindful Precision and Beauty to the flourishing fields of Aesthetics in Botanical Studies.
 
In “Botech Compositions” Murayama goes even further bringing separate flowers in one “digital garden”. Here the image can be enjoyed as an overwhelming and continuous totality while each separate plant, which opens its transparent structures to the viewer, can be investigated as a separate organism. In the current body of work, 12 flowers and buds were used for the composition: Chicory, Bindweed, Fuchsia, Geranium, Hebe, Japanese Honeysuckle, Bladder Campion, Shrubby Cinquefoil,Spanish Broom, Green Bristlegrass, Christmas Bells and  Glory Lily. Most of the flowers were collected and researched by the artist close to the Thames Estuary (where the river meets the waters of the Northern Sea) during a residency program in “Metal Culture” Institution in Southend-on-Sea, UK. Carpets of Middle East, especially the examples of Persian Carpets were used as inspirational sources for “Botech Compositions”.

While the traditional carpet develops its patterns -its abstract narration - in 2 dimensional sequence, Murayama’s work creates 3-dimentional compositions with volumes, perspective and complex “inorganic environment” to offer the onlooker the visual experience when confronting these tangled images. “Botech Compositions” as always combine in itself scientific approach and aesthetic values.  This works, valuable as botanical studies, allow us to grasp the structure of the flowers which, being precise reproductions of the natural plants, let us compare the various specimens that coexists from this moment onwards in one “digital herbarium”.
 
 
The “Botech Composition – 1” marks the beginning of  Murayama’s new approach to the  assemblage of “Inorganic Flora”, along with the development of previously created “Botech Art“ and “Botanical Diagrams”. We believe these experiments in Digital Art will shed more light on possibilities of computer generated images to stretch the limits of traditional botanical illustration. 

 

Macoto Murayama, Botech Composition - 1 - b, digital c-print, 150x100cm, 2013, Ed.5

 

Frantic Gallery proudly presents the new series of works by Macoto Murayama titled “Botech Compositions” in which the artist brings together in one digital image different types of flowers structuring it in a labyrinth type of visuality with carpet-like expansion.

 

As in previous works summarized by the titled “Botech Art” everything starts with the real flower. Macoto finds the suitable plant, dissects it by cutting the petal and ovary with scalpel and observes it with magnifying glasses and microscope. He makes sketches and photographs its parts modeling its form and structure using 3ds Max, a softwear for architecture and 3D animation. He renders digitalized elements of the organic form and creates a composition, generating symbiotic image that eventually unites the Botanic and the Technical, Organic and Artificial, Nature and Digit. The “Botech” synthesis, in spite of its oxymoronic nature, stays true to both Science and Nature leading the viewer along the borderline of Mindful Precision and Beauty to the flourishing fields of Aesthetics in Botanical Studies.

 

In “Botech Compositions” Murayama goes even further bringing separate flowers in one “digital garden”. Here the image can be enjoyed as an overwhelming and continuous totality while each separate plant, which opens its transparent structures to the viewer, can be investigated as a separate organism. In the current body of work, 12 flowers and buds were used for the composition: Chicory, Bindweed, Fuchsia, Geranium, Hebe, Japanese Honeysuckle, Bladder Campion, Shrubby Cinquefoil,Spanish Broom, Green Bristlegrass, Christmas Bells and  Glory Lily. Most of the flowers were collected and researched by the artist close to the Thames Estuary (where the river meets the waters of the Northern Sea) during a residency program in “Metal Culture” Institution in Southend-on-Sea, UK. Carpets of Middle East, especially the examples of Persian Carpets were used as inspirational sources for “Botech Compositions”.

While the traditional carpet develops its patterns its abstract narration in 2 dimensional sequence, Murayama’s work creates 3-dimentional compositions with volumes, perspective and complex “inorganic environment” to offer the onlooker the visual experience when confronting these tangled images. “Botech Compositions” as always combine in itself scientific approach and aesthetic values.  This works, valuable as botanical studies, allow us to grasp the structure of the flowers which, being precise reproductions of the natural plants, let us compare the various specimens that coexists from this moment onwards in one “digital herbarium”.

 

 

The “Botech Composition – 1” marks the beginning of  Murayama’s new approach to the  assemblage of “Inorganic Flora”, along with the development of previously created “Botech Art“ and “Botanical Diagrams”. We believe these experiments in Digital Art will shed more light on possibilities of computer generated images to stretch the limits of traditional botanical illustration.

 

Photo 7 Nov Macoto Murayama, Botech Composition - 1 - bc, digital c-print, 150x100cm, 2013, Ed.5
 Frantic Gallery proudly presents the new series of works by Macoto Murayama titled “Botech Compositions” in which the artist brings together in one digital image different types of flowers structuring it in a labyrinth type of visuality with carpet-like expansion.
 
As in previous works summarized by the titled “Botech Art” everything starts with the real flower. Macoto finds the suitable plant, dissects it by cutting the petal and ovary with scalpel and observes it with magnifying glasses and microscope. He makes sketches and photographs its parts modeling its form and structure using 3ds Max, a softwear for architecture and 3D animation. He renders digitalized elements of the organic form and creates a composition, generating symbiotic image that eventually unites the Botanic and the Technical, Organic and Artificial, Nature and Digit. The “Botech” synthesis, in spite of its oxymoronic nature, stays true to both Science and Nature leading the viewer along the borderline of Mindful Precision and Beauty to the flourishing fields of Aesthetics in Botanical Studies.
 
In “Botech Compositions” Murayama goes even further bringing separate flowers in one “digital garden”. Here the image can be enjoyed as an overwhelming and continuous totality while each separate plant, which opens its transparent structures to the viewer, can be investigated as a separate organism. In the current body of work, 12 flowers and buds were used for the composition: Chicory, Bindweed, Fuchsia, Geranium, Hebe, Japanese Honeysuckle, Bladder Campion, Shrubby Cinquefoil,Spanish Broom, Green Bristlegrass, Christmas Bells and  Glory Lily. Most of the flowers were collected and researched by the artist close to the Thames Estuary (where the river meets the waters of the Northern Sea) during a residency program in “Metal Culture” Institution in Southend-on-Sea, UK. Carpets of Middle East, especially the examples of Persian Carpets were used as inspirational sources for “Botech Compositions”.

While the traditional carpet develops its patterns -its abstract narration - in 2 dimensional sequence, Murayama’s work creates 3-dimentional compositions with volumes, perspective and complex “inorganic environment” to offer the onlooker the visual experience when confronting these tangled images. “Botech Compositions” as always combine in itself scientific approach and aesthetic values.  This works, valuable as botanical studies, allow us to grasp the structure of the flowers which, being precise reproductions of the natural plants, let us compare the various specimens that coexists from this moment onwards in one “digital herbarium”.
 
 
The “Botech Composition – 1” marks the beginning of  Murayama’s new approach to the  assemblage of “Inorganic Flora”, along with the development of previously created “Botech Art“ and “Botanical Diagrams”. We believe these experiments in Digital Art will shed more light on possibilities of computer generated images to stretch the limits of traditional botanical illustration. 

 

Macoto Murayama, Botech Composition - 1 - bc, digital c-print, 150x100cm, 2013, Ed.5

 Frantic Gallery proudly presents the new series of works by Macoto Murayama titled “Botech Compositions” in which the artist brings together in one digital image different types of flowers structuring it in a labyrinth type of visuality with carpet-like expansion.

 

As in previous works summarized by the titled “Botech Art” everything starts with the real flower. Macoto finds the suitable plant, dissects it by cutting the petal and ovary with scalpel and observes it with magnifying glasses and microscope. He makes sketches and photographs its parts modeling its form and structure using 3ds Max, a softwear for architecture and 3D animation. He renders digitalized elements of the organic form and creates a composition, generating symbiotic image that eventually unites the Botanic and the Technical, Organic and Artificial, Nature and Digit. The “Botech” synthesis, in spite of its oxymoronic nature, stays true to both Science and Nature leading the viewer along the borderline of Mindful Precision and Beauty to the flourishing fields of Aesthetics in Botanical Studies.

 

In “Botech Compositions” Murayama goes even further bringing separate flowers in one “digital garden”. Here the image can be enjoyed as an overwhelming and continuous totality while each separate plant, which opens its transparent structures to the viewer, can be investigated as a separate organism. In the current body of work, 12 flowers and buds were used for the composition: Chicory, Bindweed, Fuchsia, Geranium, Hebe, Japanese Honeysuckle, Bladder Campion, Shrubby Cinquefoil,Spanish Broom, Green Bristlegrass, Christmas Bells and  Glory Lily. Most of the flowers were collected and researched by the artist close to the Thames Estuary (where the river meets the waters of the Northern Sea) during a residency program in “Metal Culture” Institution in Southend-on-Sea, UK. Carpets of Middle East, especially the examples of Persian Carpets were used as inspirational sources for “Botech Compositions”.

While the traditional carpet develops its patterns its abstract narration in 2 dimensional sequence, Murayama’s work creates 3-dimentional compositions with volumes, perspective and complex “inorganic environment” to offer the onlooker the visual experience when confronting these tangled images. “Botech Compositions” as always combine in itself scientific approach and aesthetic values.  This works, valuable as botanical studies, allow us to grasp the structure of the flowers which, being precise reproductions of the natural plants, let us compare the various specimens that coexists from this moment onwards in one “digital herbarium”.

 

 

The “Botech Composition – 1” marks the beginning of  Murayama’s new approach to the  assemblage of “Inorganic Flora”, along with the development of previously created “Botech Art“ and “Botanical Diagrams”. We believe these experiments in Digital Art will shed more light on possibilities of computer generated images to stretch the limits of traditional botanical illustration.

 

Video 7 Nov 3 notes
Taisuke Mohri using his hyperrealist technique and working with color pencil on paper restructures human body changing the representation as well as our perception of a face or human being. Mohri uses both detailed fragments of a face-image as well as vertical segments of a frame to recompose flesh, creating new personalized totality of human representation. This series of works deals as much with photo-realistic imaginary as it works with the essence of montage: the image offers both a fragment and a totality which are in permanent motion. The onlooker grasps/than loses/than finds again the total of a face fluctuating between The Whole and The Piece, Natural and Fabricated, moving between Beauty and Uncanny.
Video 7 Nov

We had a chance to present the first screen work by Cousteau Tazuke in The Atelier Richelieu during Cutlog Art Fair 2013 where it entered in complex relationship with the geometry and light of this “transparent building”. Previously the foundations of a private manor and the former printing house it was hosting famous magizine ‘L’Illustration’ and is noways one of the major space for various events in Paris.

Video 7 Nov

 Macoto Murayama, Botech Composition - 1 - w, digital c-print, 150x100cm, 2013, Ed.5+2ap

 Frantic Gallery proudly presents the new series of works by Macoto Murayama titled “Botech Compositions” in which the artist brings together in one digital image different types of flowers structuring it in a labyrinth type of visuality with carpet-like expansion.

 

As in previous works summarized by the titled “Botech Art” everything starts with the real flower. Macoto finds the suitable plant, dissects it by cutting the petal and ovary with scalpel and observes it with magnifying glasses and microscope. He makes sketches and photographs its parts modeling its form and structure using 3ds Max, a softwear for architecture and 3D animation. He renders digitalized elements of the organic form and creates a composition, generating symbiotic image that eventually unites the Botanic and the Technical, Organic and Artificial, Nature and Digit. The “Botech” synthesis, in spite of its oxymoronic nature, stays true to both Science and Nature leading the viewer along the borderline of Mindful Precision and Beauty to the flourishing fields of Aesthetics in Botanical Studies.

 

In “Botech Compositions” Murayama goes even further bringing separate flowers in one “digital garden”. Here the image can be enjoyed as an overwhelming and continuous totality while each separate plant, which opens its transparent structures to the viewer, can be investigated as a separate organism. In the current body of work, 12 flowers and buds were used for the composition: Chicory, Bindweed, Fuchsia, Geranium, Hebe, Japanese Honeysuckle, Bladder Campion, Shrubby Cinquefoil,Spanish Broom, Green Bristlegrass, Christmas Bells and  Glory Lily. Most of the flowers were collected and researched by the artist close to the Thames Estuary (where the river meets the waters of the Northern Sea) during a residency program in “Metal Culture” Institution in Southend-on-Sea, UK. Carpets of Middle East, especially the examples of Persian Carpets were used as inspirational sources for “Botech Compositions”.

While the traditional carpet develops its patterns its abstract narration in 2 dimensional sequence, Murayama’s work creates 3-dimentional compositions with volumes, perspective and complex “inorganic environment” to offer the onlooker the visual experience when confronting these tangled images. “Botech Compositions” as always combine in itself scientific approach and aesthetic values.  This works, valuable as botanical studies, allow us to grasp the structure of the flowers which, being precise reproductions of the natural plants, let us compare the various specimens that coexists from this moment onwards in one “digital herbarium”.

 

 

The “Botech Composition – 1” marks the beginning of  Murayama’s new approach to the  assemblage of “Inorganic Flora”, along with the development of previously created “Botech Art“ and “Botanical Diagrams”. We believe these experiments in Digital Art will shed more light on possibilities of computer generated images to stretch the limits of traditional botanical illustration. 

Video 7 Nov 3 notes

Macoto Murayama, Botech Composition - 1 - wc, digital c-print, 150x100cm, 2013, Ed.5+2ap

Frantic Gallery proudly presents the new series of works by Macoto Murayama titled “Botech Compositions” in which the artist brings together in one digital image different types of flowers structuring it in a labyrinth type of visuality with carpet-like expansion.

 

As in previous works summarized by the titled “Botech Art” everything starts with the real flower. Macoto finds the suitable plant, dissects it by cutting the petal and ovary with scalpel and observes it with magnifying glasses and microscope. He makes sketches and photographs its parts modeling its form and structure using 3ds Max, a softwear for architecture and 3D animation. He renders digitalized elements of the organic form and creates a composition, generating symbiotic image that eventually unites the Botanic and the Technical, Organic and Artificial, Nature and Digit. The “Botech” synthesis, in spite of its oxymoronic nature, stays true to both Science and Nature leading the viewer along the borderline of Mindful Precision and Beauty to the flourishing fields of Aesthetics in Botanical Studies.

 

In “Botech Compositions” Murayama goes even further bringing separate flowers in one “digital garden”. Here the image can be enjoyed as an overwhelming and continuous totality while each separate plant, which opens its transparent structures to the viewer, can be investigated as a separate organism. In the current body of work, 12 flowers and buds were used for the composition: Chicory, Bindweed, Fuchsia, Geranium, Hebe, Japanese Honeysuckle, Bladder Campion, Shrubby Cinquefoil,Spanish Broom, Green Bristlegrass, Christmas Bells and  Glory Lily. Most of the flowers were collected and researched by the artist close to the Thames Estuary (where the river meets the waters of the Northern Sea) during a residency program in “Metal Culture” Institution in Southend-on-Sea, UK. Carpets of Middle East, especially the examples of Persian Carpets were used as inspirational sources for “Botech Compositions”.

While the traditional carpet develops its patterns its abstract narration in 2 dimensional sequence, Murayama’s work creates 3-dimentional compositions with volumes, perspective and complex “inorganic environment” to offer the onlooker the visual experience when confronting these tangled images. “Botech Compositions” as always combine in itself scientific approach and aesthetic values.  This works, valuable as botanical studies, allow us to grasp the structure of the flowers which, being precise reproductions of the natural plants, let us compare the various specimens that coexists from this moment onwards in one “digital herbarium”.

 

 

The “Botech Composition – 1” marks the beginning of  Murayama’s new approach to the  assemblage of “Inorganic Flora”, along with the development of previously created “Botech Art“ and “Botanical Diagrams”. We believe these experiments in Digital Art will shed more light on possibilities of computer generated images to stretch the limits of traditional botanical illustration.

 

Photo 15 Oct 1 note Cousteau Tazuke, The Work with Acrylic Resin Surface 2013.09.17, acrylic resin, acrylic paint, alkyd paint, 60x59.5x5cm, 2013

Cousteau Tazuke, The Work with Acrylic Resin Surface 2013.09.17, acrylic resin, acrylic paint, alkyd paint, 60x59.5x5cm, 2013

Photo 15 Oct Cousteau Tazuke, The Work with Acrylic Resin Surface 2013.09.16, acrylic resin, acrylic paint, alkyd paint, aluminium, 49.5x49.5x5cm, 2013

Cousteau Tazuke, The Work with Acrylic Resin Surface 2013.09.16, acrylic resin, acrylic paint, alkyd paint, aluminium, 49.5x49.5x5cm, 2013

Photo 15 Oct 1 note Katsuya Sugimoto, Sometimes Justice, oil on canvas, 53x53cm, 2013

Katsuya Sugimoto, Sometimes Justice, oil on canvas, 53x53cm, 2013

Video 15 Oct

Frantic Studios: Atsushi Koyama’s Studio, Tokyo, Japan, 2013.10.16.

Photo 15 Oct 4 notes Atsushi Koyama, Undefined 05, oil on canvas, 91x73cm, 2013

Atsushi Koyama, Undefined 05, oil on canvas, 91x73cm, 2013


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